Butter Is Safe, Not Linked To Heart Disease, Diabetes & Death


Contrary to what people used to think, scientists has discovered that eating butter does not have any link to heart disease, and might be slightly protective against type 2 diabetes.

In the new study report by UK’s Daily Mail and Time Magazine, nine papers that included more than 600,000 people (adults), with an average age of between 44 and 71 years old, tracked over a combined total of 6.5 million years, were analyzed and it was concluded that eating one tablespoon (14 grams) of butter a day had ‘no significant association’ with any type of cardiovascular disease, including coronary heart disease and stroke.

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NOTE: The new study does not say butter is a healthy food. According to the senior study author, Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts in Boston, U.S., “butter doesn’t seem to be hugely harmful or beneficial.”

A growing number of nutrition scientists believe that cutting back on fat, even the saturated kind, is causing more harm than good. Other scientists who participated in the research; Dr Laura Pimpin said,

‘Even though people who eat more butter generally have worse diets and lifestyles, butter seemed to be pretty neutral overall.

“This suggests that butter may be a more healthful choice than sugar or starch, and a worse choice than many margarines and cooking oils — those rich in healthy fats such as soybean, canola, flaxseed, and extra virgin olive oils.”

Body lacks water

Also commenting on the research, cardiologist and National Obesity Forum adviser Dr Aseem Malhotra said:

“This high quality study clearly reveals that decades of demonising butter has been a huge mistake.

“I follow the advice I give to my patients which is providing you cut the consumption of sugar and other refined carbohydrates the regular consumption of butter can be very much part of a healthy diet.”

But another Professor, Pete Wilde, of the Institute of Food Research, warned that the study does not permit anybody to start consuming large amounts of butter’.

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“More investigations are needed into the effects of saturated fat,” said Tracy Parker of the British heart foundation.

“What we do know is fat is just one element of our diet. There are many factors which cause cardiovascular disease and no single food or nutrient is solely responsible for this.” 

He strongly recommend that to protect the health of your heart, you should eat a balanced Mediterranean style diet rich in fruit, vegetables and pulses.