Do Not Visit Gambia – U.S. Warns Citizens

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On Saturday 7th January, the United States of America warned its citizens not to visit Gambia this period until the state of the country is stable.

The government told those who want to visit Gambia to consider the risk of unrest as President Yahya Jammeh digs in despite losing an election.

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The statement said that the supreme court hearing on January 10 of Jammeh’s challenge to the result that elected his rival Adama Barrow was a potential flashpoint for violence.

“US citizens should consider departing on commercial flights and other transportation,” the statement said.

Meanwhile, the West African leaders are still pursuing mediation to ensure a peaceful transfer of power since President Yahya Jammeh has refused to accept defeat in the election, which held in December.

Liberia’s president, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, told reporters on Saturday, after a meeting among regional leaders in Ghana’s capital, Accra, that regional bloc ECOWAS did not yet intend to deploy its standby military force in the country.

When asked if the regional group would deploy a standby force soon, Ellen affirmed in the negative, adding that ECOWAS was closely monitoring proceedings in The Gambia’s Supreme Court, where Jammeh is challenging the poll result.

Meanwhile, Nigerian foreign minister Geoffrey Onyeama said ECOWAS would hold a meeting on Monday in Abuja to discuss further steps.

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Recall that Jammeh, a former coup leader who has ruled the country for 22 years, initially accepted his defeat by opposition figure Adama Barrow in the December 1 election.

Surprisingly, he reversed his position a week later, vowing to hang onto power despite a wave of regional and international condemnation.

However, Gambians are seeking serious justice after 22-years of terror and want a new leader to rule the nation.

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