Wow! This New Device Tells You When You Are Too Drunk To Drive

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This is actually one of the reasons wonders of technology will never end! Proof by Milo Sensors is launching a slim wrist band that fits around your wrist like any of the fitness trackers on the market, but instead of tracking your motions with an accelerometer, Proof reads alcohol molecules through your skin.

Proof by Milo Sensors is launching a slim wristband that fits around your wrist like any of the fitness trackers on the market, but instead of tracking your motions with an accelerometer, Proof reads alcohol molecules through your skin.

According to Proof, the enzyme-based electrochemical sensor converts alcohol into an electrical current, and is able to accurately display your blood alcohol content (BAC) level discreetly using its accompanying Android or iOS app.

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With this new device, your friends at the bar may think you’re checking your phone or timer but instead you’re seeing if you are ‘sane’ enough to drive home.

In addition to tracking your current level, Proof can predict how drunk you’ll be later in the night. It can also predict when you’ll be sober and can let alert you when you hit a specific BAC level.

So if you’re winding down at the bar and want to know when you’re sober enough to drive, punch it into the app and it will send you a notification to your device telling you you’re sober enough to drive.

The app also has a friends feature that is invite only, so that you can track your loved ones that are out for the night and make sure they are drinking responsibly.

The National Institute of Health dumped $100,000 into the project, and after two years of development and third-party testing against blood tests, IV injections and wearables, Strenk says Proof is comparable to consumer breathalyzers.

alcohol-proof

Recently, some scientists and engineers from UC San Diego developed a “temporary tattoo” sensor system that is able to give an indication of how much alcohol you have in your body.

The team of engineers screen printed silver and silver chloride electrodes onto commercial tattoo paper.

These electrodes can generate a small current for five minutes. The current causes a thin layer of gel on the tattoo to release a drug that causes the wearer to sweat.

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When the tattoo becomes moist with sweat, an electrochemical sensor made of an alcohol-sensitive enzyme can measure alcohol concentration in the perspiration. The results are then transferred to a phone via Bluetooth.