Pro-Biafrans Chant War Songs As Court Reject Bail Of Nnamdi Kanu…Again

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Pro-Brafra protesters were chanting war songs and hauling stones at security force prison vans as it escorted the leader of the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB), Nnamdi Kanu back to Kuje prison after his bail application was once again rejected.

The court hearing which held Thursday, December 1, at the Federal High Court declared Kanu’s offences too serious in nature, hence Justice Binta Nyako refuse the bail and order accelerated hearing within two months.

See Also: MASSOB Urges Ndi-Igbo To Fast And Pray For Nnamdi Kanu’s Release

Recall the same court had in December 17, 2015 ordered the Department of State and Service, DSS to release Mr. Kanu unconditionally. But that ruling, given by Justice Adeniyi Ademola (who has been accused of fraud and is currently being prosecuted), was upturned by another judge, John Tsoho in January.

Speaking in defence of allegations levelled against them, Kanu and his co-accused Benjamin Nmadubugwu, Chidiebere Onwudiwe and David Nwawusi, said the charges against them were not only bailable offences but also not a felony, punishable by death.



They pointed out their rights to self-determination was guaranteed both by the Nigerian constitution and Article 20 of the African Charter of People’s and Human Rights, adding that IPOB, which according to them is registered in over 30 countries, has not been declared as a dangerous organisation under any law.

Meanwhile, President Muhammadu Buhari during his first media chat on December 2015, said that people like Nnamdi Kanu and immediate National Security Adviser, Sambo Dasuki, who were accused of grave offences, could not be granted bail because of the gravity of the offences they had committed.

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Justice Nyako during the court proceedings had pointed that “President Muhammadu Buhari is entitled to freedom of expression and his opinion, hence his words “does not have the force of law on the court.”

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