President Mugabe Punishes Student For Demanding Jobs From Him

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Last week, a Zimbabwean student incurred the wrath of President Mugabe for demanding jobs from him during a graduation ceremony at the National University of Science and Technology (NUST).

The student activist, Advance Musoki was arrested last Friday at NUST in Bulawayo for “raising a placard as students fight for their future, with bleak employment opportunities”.

Advance Musoki who appeared at the Bulawayo magistrates court on Tuesday pleaded guilty to a charge of criminal nuisance in contravention of section 46 of the criminal law. He was sentenced to two weeks behind bars or pay a $50 fine.

Also See: Robert Mugabe Calls Zimbabwe’s Olympic Team ‘Useless’ Orders Arrest

While pleading for leniency, Musoki’s lawyer Mehluli Dube from the Zimbabwe Lawyers for Human Rights (ZLHR) said that his client was unemployed and had no savings in his bank account.

His lawyer said the offender was unemployed and had no savings in the bank, and did not waste the courts time in denying the charge.



This is not the first time such an event is happening in Zimbabwe. In September, another student Tonderai Dombo was arrested at a graduation ceremony at the main University of Zimbabwe in Harare for holding up a placard demanding jobs, though he was later released – but then summoned to a disciplinary hearing by the university.

Last week, Zimbabweans based in the United Kingdom organised a protest in solidarity with campaigns at home to denounce President Robert Mugabe’s perceived mishandling of the economy and alleged crackdown by the state security forces.

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The grievances made by the protesters include; the government’s handling of the economy, failure to deliver the 2013 election promise to create 2,2 million jobs and the introduction of a new currency – dubbed ‘bond notes’.

Read Also: What Zimbabweans Did To Their 92 Year Old President

The protesters echoed fears that the new currency could throw the nation back to the horrors of its 2008 crisis, when the nation’s former banknotes became worthless, Zimbabweans lost all their savings and poverty skyrocketed.